woefulbadger2:

scalestails:

fightingforanimals:

Why feeding water birds bread is harmful:
Duckling Malnutrition: In an area where ducks are regularly fed bread, ducklings will not receive adequate nutrition for proper growth and development. Furthermore, because ducks will naturally seek out an easy food source such as human handouts, ducklings will not learn to forage for natural foods as easily.
Overcrowding: Where an easy food source is abundant, ducks and other waterfowl will lay more eggs and the pond or lake will become overcrowded. This makes it more difficult for the birds to seek out healthier food sources and increases the likelihood of territorial aggression.
Pollution: When too much bread is offered to ducks, not all of it will be eaten. The soggy, uneaten bread is unsightly and rotting bread can create noxious odors as well as lead to greater algae growth that can clog natural waterways. This concentrates the pollution and can eventually eradicate fish and other life in the vicinity.
Diseases: Feeding ducks bread can increase the spread of diseases in two ways. First, a carbohydrate-rich diet leads to greater defecation, and bird feces easily harbor bacteria responsible for numerous diseases, including avian botulism. Second, moldy bread can cause aspergillosis, a fatal lung infection that can decimate entire duck and waterfowl flocks.
Pest Attraction: Rotting supplies of food leftover from sated ducks will attract other unwelcome pests such as rats, mice and insects. These pests can also harbor additional diseases that can be dangerous to humans.
Loss of Natural Behaviour: When birds become accustomed to handouts, they lose their natural fear of humans and may become aggressive in order to get more food. Their loss of fear can also cause other dangers, such as a willingness to cross busy roads in order to reach picnickers and other likely sources of food.
Good Foods to Feed Ducks:
The best foods for ducks are those that provide the nutrients, minerals and vitamins the birds need for healthy growth and development. Many of these foods are similar to the natural seeds, grains and plants the birds will forage on their own. As omnivorous birds, ducks will eat a great deal of different foods, and the best foods to offer ducks include:
Cracked corn
Wheat, barley or similar grains
Oats (uncooked; rolled or quick)
Rice (cooked or uncooked)
Birdseed (any type or mix)
Grapes (cut in half)
Frozen peas or corn (defrosted, no need to cook)
Earthworms
Mealworms (fresh or dried)
Chopped lettuce or other greens or salad mixes
Vegetable trimmings or peels (chopped)
Duck feed pellets or poultry starter pellets (x)

Every year I will reblog some kind of reminder of this! Please don’t feed waterfowl bread.

I used to volunteer at a country park and we would literally ban people if they fed the ducks and swans bread. People said it was because we wanted to make money via the seeds we sold in the gift shop (which were a special blend especially for waterfowl) but in reality it is because disposing of ducks that had died from being fed too much bread was starting to have a mental impact on the volunteers.

woefulbadger2:

scalestails:

fightingforanimals:

Why feeding water birds bread is harmful:

  • Duckling Malnutrition: In an area where ducks are regularly fed bread, ducklings will not receive adequate nutrition for proper growth and development. Furthermore, because ducks will naturally seek out an easy food source such as human handouts, ducklings will not learn to forage for natural foods as easily.
  • Overcrowding: Where an easy food source is abundant, ducks and other waterfowl will lay more eggs and the pond or lake will become overcrowded. This makes it more difficult for the birds to seek out healthier food sources and increases the likelihood of territorial aggression.
  • Pollution: When too much bread is offered to ducks, not all of it will be eaten. The soggy, uneaten bread is unsightly and rotting bread can create noxious odors as well as lead to greater algae growth that can clog natural waterways. This concentrates the pollution and can eventually eradicate fish and other life in the vicinity.
  • Diseases: Feeding ducks bread can increase the spread of diseases in two ways. First, a carbohydrate-rich diet leads to greater defecation, and bird feces easily harbor bacteria responsible for numerous diseases, including avian botulism. Second, moldy bread can cause aspergillosis, a fatal lung infection that can decimate entire duck and waterfowl flocks.
  • Pest Attraction: Rotting supplies of food leftover from sated ducks will attract other unwelcome pests such as rats, mice and insects. These pests can also harbor additional diseases that can be dangerous to humans.
  • Loss of Natural Behaviour: When birds become accustomed to handouts, they lose their natural fear of humans and may become aggressive in order to get more food. Their loss of fear can also cause other dangers, such as a willingness to cross busy roads in order to reach picnickers and other likely sources of food.

Good Foods to Feed Ducks:

The best foods for ducks are those that provide the nutrients, minerals and vitamins the birds need for healthy growth and development. Many of these foods are similar to the natural seeds, grains and plants the birds will forage on their own. As omnivorous birds, ducks will eat a great deal of different foods, and the best foods to offer ducks include:

  • Cracked corn
  • Wheat, barley or similar grains
  • Oats (uncooked; rolled or quick)
  • Rice (cooked or uncooked)
  • Birdseed (any type or mix)
  • Grapes (cut in half)
  • Frozen peas or corn (defrosted, no need to cook)
  • Earthworms
  • Mealworms (fresh or dried)
  • Chopped lettuce or other greens or salad mixes
  • Vegetable trimmings or peels (chopped)
  • Duck feed pellets or poultry starter pellets (x)

Every year I will reblog some kind of reminder of this! Please don’t feed waterfowl bread.

I used to volunteer at a country park and we would literally ban people if they fed the ducks and swans bread. People said it was because we wanted to make money via the seeds we sold in the gift shop (which were a special blend especially for waterfowl) but in reality it is because disposing of ducks that had died from being fed too much bread was starting to have a mental impact on the volunteers.

(via queenofshenanigans)

gifak-net:

Owl Helps Guy Draw on Tablet [ video ]

gifak-net:

Owl Helps Guy Draw on Tablet [ video ]

(via jerakeenc)

ursulavernon:

featheroftheowl:

Preening Barn Owl at Sunset by teagden

This is possibly the only time I have ever seen a barn owl look happy about anything.

ursulavernon:

featheroftheowl:

Preening Barn Owl at Sunset by teagden

This is possibly the only time I have ever seen a barn owl look happy about anything.

(via writeroost)

fat-birds:

roachpatrol:

birdcagewalk:

lindasinklings:tucked in. via (onceuponawildflower)

ALL HAIL THE BIRD ORB

eeee look at the little bird ball!

fat-birds:

roachpatrol:

birdcagewalk:

lindasinklings:tucked in. via (onceuponawildflower)

ALL HAIL THE BIRD ORB

eeee look at the little bird ball!

(Source: cold-sunset, via teapotsahoy)

kokiron:

bigeisamazing:

Crows are one of the smartest animals out here.

kokiron:

bigeisamazing:

Crows are one of the smartest animals out here.

(Source: ForGIFs.com, via scinerds)

magicalnaturetour:

Sweet Photos of a Senior Golden Retriever Snuggling with Baby Chicks. Remember Champ, the happiest dog in the world? His owner, 21-year-old Candice Sedighan, just shared with us a new series of photos she’s taken of the adorable dog and his newfound friends. All Photos by Candice Sedighan via  My Modern Metropolis  ~ Older dogs are adorable, too.♥

(via jebiwonkenobi)

prettyarbitrary:

king-amphy:

llbwwb:

PSA:My Mother never told me this! Reblog to save a baby Bird:)

JUST A LITTLE HISTORY FACT MY GRANDFATHER TOLD ME:The reason this myth was a thing, was because back in the 30’s-50’s or so ( I can’t remember the time)There was a parasite that was living in birds. It was hard to explain it to children, so they basically made up this myth so children wouldn’t touch the birds incase it carried the parasite.THE MORE YOU KNOW YEA?

There’s no parasite, aside from your occasional typical wild-animal flea or mite infestation, and there never was.  Parasites don’t mystically vanish from the earth, after all; as a rule, they tend to be pretty successful at species survival.  
The origin of this myth is 99% likely to be an attempt to keep small children from picking up baby birds they find and carrying them off.  To that end, it remains a tempting lie to tell an overly curious kid, even for adults who know it’s not the truth.
Birds do have a sense of smell; it’s about equivalent to a human’s (which is to say, they BARELY have a sense of smell).  But even if they can smell your obnoxiously perfumed hand lotion all over their babies, it’s hardly going to make them abandon the little tykes.
(The same goes for deer, which have a much better sense of smell than a bird and will simply lick your repulsive predatory human-scent off if you’ve touched their fawns.  Which is not permission to go groping the little speckled deerlets, no matter how much I’d you’d like to.)

prettyarbitrary:

king-amphy:

llbwwb:

PSA:My Mother never told me this! Reblog to save a baby Bird:)

JUST A LITTLE HISTORY FACT MY GRANDFATHER TOLD ME:
The reason this myth was a thing, was because back in the 30’s-50’s or so ( I can’t remember the time)
There was a parasite that was living in birds. It was hard to explain it to children, so they basically made up this myth so children wouldn’t touch the birds incase it carried the parasite.
THE MORE YOU KNOW YEA?

There’s no parasite, aside from your occasional typical wild-animal flea or mite infestation, and there never was.  Parasites don’t mystically vanish from the earth, after all; as a rule, they tend to be pretty successful at species survival.  

The origin of this myth is 99% likely to be an attempt to keep small children from picking up baby birds they find and carrying them off.  To that end, it remains a tempting lie to tell an overly curious kid, even for adults who know it’s not the truth.

Birds do have a sense of smell; it’s about equivalent to a human’s (which is to say, they BARELY have a sense of smell).  But even if they can smell your obnoxiously perfumed hand lotion all over their babies, it’s hardly going to make them abandon the little tykes.

(The same goes for deer, which have a much better sense of smell than a bird and will simply lick your repulsive predatory human-scent off if you’ve touched their fawns.  Which is not permission to go groping the little speckled deerlets, no matter how much I’d you’d like to.)

(Source: pyr4mi-ds, via writeroost)

50-shades-of-hetalia:

FRIEND IS SAD????

HERE FRIEND HAVE PUFFINS

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OK FRIEND I HOPE YOU FEEL BETTER

(via hungrylikethewolfie)

jtotheizzoe:

Sticking plungers to chickens’ butts… you know, for science!
Chickens and other birds are modern relatives of non-avian theropods, a large order of dinosaurs that contains Tyrannosaurus rex, raptors (like Deinonychus), and other primarily bipedal reptilian beasts. They stood mostly on their two rear legs and used massive muscular tails for balance:

They weren’t all big monsters, though. There were also cute little theropods like these guys:

If you need help keeping your dino-groups straight, contrast theropods with sauropods, which include these large, long-necked, four-on-the-floor herbivores:

There’s many more sub-orders of dinosaurs, find out where more of your favorites fall on this Wikipedia page. 
Seeing as chickens and their relative are the closest living thing to theropod dinosaurs, a group of biologists thought they’d be a great model to study how T. rex and friends walked. The only problem is that chickens don’t have the long tails that their dino ancestors carried around.
Solution? Stick one on and film ‘em!
The addition of a plunger-butt tail affected the bird’s center of mass and its gait, as well as where it held its bones during standing and walking. You can read more about the research at io9, or check out the original paper (open access) at PLOS One. 
Previously: Check out a great TED-Ed video about the evolution of feathers in dinosaurs, narrated by Carl Zimmer.

jtotheizzoe:

Sticking plungers to chickens’ butts… you know, for science!

Chickens and other birds are modern relatives of non-avian theropods, a large order of dinosaurs that contains Tyrannosaurus rex, raptors (like Deinonychus), and other primarily bipedal reptilian beasts. They stood mostly on their two rear legs and used massive muscular tails for balance:

They weren’t all big monsters, though. There were also cute little theropods like these guys:

If you need help keeping your dino-groups straight, contrast theropods with sauropods, which include these large, long-necked, four-on-the-floor herbivores:

There’s many more sub-orders of dinosaurs, find out where more of your favorites fall on this Wikipedia page

Seeing as chickens and their relative are the closest living thing to theropod dinosaurs, a group of biologists thought they’d be a great model to study how T. rex and friends walked. The only problem is that chickens don’t have the long tails that their dino ancestors carried around.

Solution? Stick one on and film ‘em!

The addition of a plunger-butt tail affected the bird’s center of mass and its gait, as well as where it held its bones during standing and walking. You can read more about the research at io9, or check out the original paper (open access) at PLOS One

Previously: Check out a great TED-Ed video about the evolution of feathers in dinosaurs, narrated by Carl Zimmer.