fat-birds:

roachpatrol:

birdcagewalk:

lindasinklings:tucked in. via (onceuponawildflower)

ALL HAIL THE BIRD ORB

eeee look at the little bird ball!

fat-birds:

roachpatrol:

birdcagewalk:

lindasinklings:tucked in. via (onceuponawildflower)

ALL HAIL THE BIRD ORB

eeee look at the little bird ball!

(Source: cold-sunset, via teapotsahoy)

kokiron:

bigeisamazing:

Crows are one of the smartest animals out here.

kokiron:

bigeisamazing:

Crows are one of the smartest animals out here.

(Source: ForGIFs.com, via scinerds)

magicalnaturetour:

Sweet Photos of a Senior Golden Retriever Snuggling with Baby Chicks. Remember Champ, the happiest dog in the world? His owner, 21-year-old Candice Sedighan, just shared with us a new series of photos she’s taken of the adorable dog and his newfound friends. All Photos by Candice Sedighan via  My Modern Metropolis  ~ Older dogs are adorable, too.♥

(via jebiwonkenobi)

prettyarbitrary:

king-amphy:

llbwwb:

PSA:My Mother never told me this! Reblog to save a baby Bird:)

JUST A LITTLE HISTORY FACT MY GRANDFATHER TOLD ME:The reason this myth was a thing, was because back in the 30’s-50’s or so ( I can’t remember the time)There was a parasite that was living in birds. It was hard to explain it to children, so they basically made up this myth so children wouldn’t touch the birds incase it carried the parasite.THE MORE YOU KNOW YEA?

There’s no parasite, aside from your occasional typical wild-animal flea or mite infestation, and there never was.  Parasites don’t mystically vanish from the earth, after all; as a rule, they tend to be pretty successful at species survival.  
The origin of this myth is 99% likely to be an attempt to keep small children from picking up baby birds they find and carrying them off.  To that end, it remains a tempting lie to tell an overly curious kid, even for adults who know it’s not the truth.
Birds do have a sense of smell; it’s about equivalent to a human’s (which is to say, they BARELY have a sense of smell).  But even if they can smell your obnoxiously perfumed hand lotion all over their babies, it’s hardly going to make them abandon the little tykes.
(The same goes for deer, which have a much better sense of smell than a bird and will simply lick your repulsive predatory human-scent off if you’ve touched their fawns.  Which is not permission to go groping the little speckled deerlets, no matter how much I’d you’d like to.)

prettyarbitrary:

king-amphy:

llbwwb:

PSA:My Mother never told me this! Reblog to save a baby Bird:)

JUST A LITTLE HISTORY FACT MY GRANDFATHER TOLD ME:
The reason this myth was a thing, was because back in the 30’s-50’s or so ( I can’t remember the time)
There was a parasite that was living in birds. It was hard to explain it to children, so they basically made up this myth so children wouldn’t touch the birds incase it carried the parasite.
THE MORE YOU KNOW YEA?

There’s no parasite, aside from your occasional typical wild-animal flea or mite infestation, and there never was.  Parasites don’t mystically vanish from the earth, after all; as a rule, they tend to be pretty successful at species survival.  

The origin of this myth is 99% likely to be an attempt to keep small children from picking up baby birds they find and carrying them off.  To that end, it remains a tempting lie to tell an overly curious kid, even for adults who know it’s not the truth.

Birds do have a sense of smell; it’s about equivalent to a human’s (which is to say, they BARELY have a sense of smell).  But even if they can smell your obnoxiously perfumed hand lotion all over their babies, it’s hardly going to make them abandon the little tykes.

(The same goes for deer, which have a much better sense of smell than a bird and will simply lick your repulsive predatory human-scent off if you’ve touched their fawns.  Which is not permission to go groping the little speckled deerlets, no matter how much I’d you’d like to.)

(Source: pyr4mi-ds, via writeroost)

50-shades-of-hetalia:

FRIEND IS SAD????

HERE FRIEND HAVE PUFFINS

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OK FRIEND I HOPE YOU FEEL BETTER

(via hungrylikethewolfie)

jtotheizzoe:

Sticking plungers to chickens’ butts… you know, for science!
Chickens and other birds are modern relatives of non-avian theropods, a large order of dinosaurs that contains Tyrannosaurus rex, raptors (like Deinonychus), and other primarily bipedal reptilian beasts. They stood mostly on their two rear legs and used massive muscular tails for balance:

They weren’t all big monsters, though. There were also cute little theropods like these guys:

If you need help keeping your dino-groups straight, contrast theropods with sauropods, which include these large, long-necked, four-on-the-floor herbivores:

There’s many more sub-orders of dinosaurs, find out where more of your favorites fall on this Wikipedia page. 
Seeing as chickens and their relative are the closest living thing to theropod dinosaurs, a group of biologists thought they’d be a great model to study how T. rex and friends walked. The only problem is that chickens don’t have the long tails that their dino ancestors carried around.
Solution? Stick one on and film ‘em!
The addition of a plunger-butt tail affected the bird’s center of mass and its gait, as well as where it held its bones during standing and walking. You can read more about the research at io9, or check out the original paper (open access) at PLOS One. 
Previously: Check out a great TED-Ed video about the evolution of feathers in dinosaurs, narrated by Carl Zimmer.

jtotheizzoe:

Sticking plungers to chickens’ butts… you know, for science!

Chickens and other birds are modern relatives of non-avian theropods, a large order of dinosaurs that contains Tyrannosaurus rex, raptors (like Deinonychus), and other primarily bipedal reptilian beasts. They stood mostly on their two rear legs and used massive muscular tails for balance:

They weren’t all big monsters, though. There were also cute little theropods like these guys:

If you need help keeping your dino-groups straight, contrast theropods with sauropods, which include these large, long-necked, four-on-the-floor herbivores:

There’s many more sub-orders of dinosaurs, find out where more of your favorites fall on this Wikipedia page

Seeing as chickens and their relative are the closest living thing to theropod dinosaurs, a group of biologists thought they’d be a great model to study how T. rex and friends walked. The only problem is that chickens don’t have the long tails that their dino ancestors carried around.

Solution? Stick one on and film ‘em!

The addition of a plunger-butt tail affected the bird’s center of mass and its gait, as well as where it held its bones during standing and walking. You can read more about the research at io9, or check out the original paper (open access) at PLOS One

Previously: Check out a great TED-Ed video about the evolution of feathers in dinosaurs, narrated by Carl Zimmer.

stephaniecoco:

happiness

(Source: iraffiruse, via the1001cranes)

Baby ducks, apparently imprinted on the wrong mama. Luckily, she’s okay with it. 

(via jerakeenc)

stuckinabucket:

o-heichou-my-heichou:

THIS FUCKING HAWK LOOKS LIKE HE’S IN SO MUCH DISTRESS. HE JUST POPPED THE INFLATABLE PIGEON AND JUST LOOK AT HIM. LIKE “PREY MELT? WHAT DO? THIS NOT IN HAWK SCHOOL. THIS NOT FOOD.”

stuckinabucket:

o-heichou-my-heichou:

THIS FUCKING HAWK LOOKS LIKE HE’S IN SO MUCH DISTRESS. HE JUST POPPED THE INFLATABLE PIGEON AND JUST LOOK AT HIM. LIKE “PREY MELT? WHAT DO? THIS NOT IN HAWK SCHOOL. THIS NOT FOOD.”